Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus

White
Double of the First Class

(When the first Sunday occurring in the year falls on January 1 or 6, or 7, the feast of the holy Name is kept on January 2.)

The second Sunday after Epiphany, which recalls the Marriage feast of Cana, was at first chosen as the day on which to honor the most holy Name of Jesus. It is on the Wedding Day that the Bridegroom gives his Name to the Bride, and it is the sign that, from that day forward, she belongs to him alone. The Church, therefore, wishing to honor a name so precious to her with a special feast, could find no day more appropriate for it than that of the Marriage at Cana. But now she has chosen for the celebration of this august Name, a day closer to the Anniversary on which it was given, “after eight days were accomplished, his name was called Jesus;” she leaves, however, the commemoration of the Sacred Nuptials to the Sunday of which it has ever been the glory.

In the Old Covenant, the Name of God inspired fear and awe: nor was the honor of pronouncing it granted to all the children of Israel. We can understand this. God had not yet come down from heaven to live on earth, and converse with men; he had not yet taken upon himself our poor nature, and become Man like ourselves; the sweet Name expressive of love and tenderness, could not be applied to him.

But, when the fullness of time had come—when the mystery of love was about to be revealed—then did heaven send down the Name of “Jesus” to our earth, as a pledge of the speedy coming of him who was to bear it. The archangel Gabriel said to Mary: Thou shalt call his name Jesus. “Jesus” means Savior. How sweet will this Name not be to poor lost man! It seems to link earth to heaven! No name is so amiable, none is so powerful. Every knee in heaven, on earth, and in hell, bows in adoration at hearing this Name! and yet, who can pronounce it, and not feel love spring up within his heart? But we need such a saint as Bernard, to tell us of the power and sweetness of this blessed Name. He thus speaks of it in one of his sermons.

“The Name of Jesus is Light, and Food, and Medicine. It is Light, when it is preached to us; it is Food, when we think upon it; it is the Medicine that soothes our pains when we invoke it. Let us say a word on each of these. Tell me, whence came there, into the whole world, so bright and sudden a light, if not from the preaching of the Name of Jesus? Was it not by the light of this Name that God called us unto his admirable Light? Wherewith being enlightened, and in this light, seeing the Light, we take these words of Paul as truly addressed to ourselves: Heretofore, you were darkness; but now, light in the Lord.

“Nor is the Name of Jesus Light only; it is also Food. Art thou not strengthened, as often as thou thinkest of this Name? What is there that so feeds the mind of him that meditates upon this Name? What is there that so restores the wearied faculties, strengthens virtue, gives vigor to good and holy habits, and fosters chastity? Every food of the soul is dry, that is not steeped in this unction; it is insipid, if it be not seasoned with this salt. If thou write, I relish not thy writing, unless I read there the Name of Jesus. If thou teach me, or converse with me, I relish not thy words, unless I hear thee say the Name of Jesus. Jesus is honey to the mouth, and music to the ear, and gladness to the heart.

“It is also Medicine. Is any one among you sad? Let but Jesus come into his heart, and the mouth echo him, saying Jesus! and lo! the light of that Name disperses every cloud, and brings sunshine back again. Have any of you committed sin? and is despair driving you into the snare of death? Invoke the Name of life, and life will come back to the soul. Was there ever a man, that, hearing this saving Name, could keep up that common fault of hardness of heart, or drowsiness of sluggishness, or rancor of soul, or languor of sloth? If any one, perchance, felt that the fountain of his tears was dry, did it not gush forth more plentifully than ever, and flow more sweetly than ever, as soon as he invoked the Name of Jesus? If any of us were ever in danger, and our heart beat with fear, did not this Name of power bring us confidence and courage the moment we pronounced it? When we were tossed to and fro by perplexing doubts, did not the evidence of what was right burst on us as we called upon the Name of light? When we were discouraged, and well nigh crushed, by adversity, did not our heart take courage, when our tongue uttered the Name of help? All this is most true; for all these miseries are the sicknesses and faintings of our soul, and the Name of Jesus is our Medicine.

“But, let us see how all this comes to pass. Call upon me in the day of trouble, says the Lord; I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me. There is nothing which so restrains the impulse of anger, calms the swelling of pride, heals the wound of envy, represses the insatiability of luxury, smothers the flame of lust, quenches the thirst of avarice, and dispels the fever of uncleanliness—as the Name of Jesus. For when I pronounce this Name, I bring before my mind the Man, who, by excellence, is meek and humble of heart, benign, sober, chaste, merciful, and filled with everything that is good and holy, nay, who is the very God Almighty—whose example heals me, and whose assistance strengthens me. I say all this, when I say Jesus. Here have I my model, for he is Man; and my help, for he is God; the one provides me with precious drugs, the other gives them efficacy; and from the two I make a potion such as no physician knows how to make.

“Here is the electuary, my soul, his in the casket of this Name Jesus; believe me, it is wholesome, and good for every ailment thou canst possibly have. Ever have it with thee, in thy bosom and in thy hand; so that all thy affections and actions may be directed to Jesus.

The feast of the Holy Name is of comparatively recent origin; its first promoter was St. Bernardine of Siena, who lived in the fifteenth century. This holy man established the practice of representing the Holy Name of Jesus surrounded with rays, and formed into a monogram of its three first letters, ihs. The custom spread rapidly through Italy, and was zealously propagated by the great St. John of Capestrano, who, like St. Bernardine of Siena, was of the Order of Friars Minor. The Holy See gave its formal approbation to this manner of honoring the Name of our Savior, and, in the early part of the sixteenth century, Pope Clement VI, after long entreaties, granted to the whole Franciscan Order the privilege of keeping a special Feast in honor of the Most Holy Name of Jesus.

Rome extended the same favor to various Churches; and, at length, the Feast was inserted in the universal Calendar. It was in the year 1721, at the request of Charles VI, Emperor of Germany, that Pope Innocent XII decreed that the Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus should be kept throughout the whole Church; he also chose the Second Sunday after the Epiphany as the day, but as we have already explained, the feast is now fixed for the Sunday following the Circumcision.

Mass.—The Church begins her chants by proclaiming the glory of the Name of her Spouse. Heaven, earth, and hell! bow ye down at the sound of this adorable Name, for the Son of Man, who bears this Name, is also the Son of God.

Introit

In Nomine Jesu omne genu flectatur, cœlestium, terrestrium et infernorum; et omnis lingua confiteatur, quia Dominus Jesus Christus in gloria est Dei Patris.

At the Name of Jesus, let eery knee bend in heaven, on earth, and under the earth; and every tongue confess, that the Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father.

Ps. Domine, Dominus noster, quam admirabile est Nomen tuum in universa terra! ℣. Gloria Patri. In Nomine Jesu.

Ps. O Lord, our Lord, how wonderful is thy name over the whole earth. ℣. Glory. At the Name.

In the Collect, the Church, which, during her exile, finds consolation in the Name of her divine Spouse, prays that she may see his blessed face in heaven.

Collect

Deus, qui unigenitum Filium tuum ocnstituisti humani generis Salvatorem, et Jesum vocari jussisti: concede propitius, ut cujus sanctum Nomen veneramur in terris, ejus quoque aspectu perfruamur in cœlis. Per eumdem.

O God, who didst appoint thy Only-Begotten Son the Savior of mankind, and commandedst that his name should be called Jesus: mercifully grant, that we who venerate this holy Name on earth, may also enjoy his sight in heaven. Through the same, &c.

No commemoration is made of the Sunday; but on January 2, 3, or 4 the occurring Octave Day is commemorated in private Masses only; and on January 5 the Vigil of the Epiphany is commemorated in all Masses, and St. Telesphorus, Pope and Martyr, in private Masses.

Epistle
Lectio Actuum Apostolorum. Lesson from the Acts of the Apostles.
Cap. iv. Ch. iv.

In diebus illis, Petrus Spiritu Sancto repletus, dixit: Principes populi, et seniores, audite: si nos hodie dijudicamur in benefacto hominis infirmi, in quo iste salvus factus est, notum sit omnibus vobis, et omni plebi Israel: quia in nomine Domini nostri Jesu Christi Nazareni, quem vos crucifixistis, quem Deus suscitavit a mortuis, in hoc iste astat coram vobis sanus. Hic est lapis qui reprobatus est a vobis ædificantibus, qui factus est in caput anguli: et non est in alio aliquo salus. Nec enim aliud nomen est sub caelo datum hominibus, in quo oporteat nos salvos fieri.

In those days: Peter, being filled with the Holy Ghost, said to them: Ye princes of the people, and ancients, hear: If we this day are examined concerning the good deed done to the infirm man, by what means he hath been made whole: Be it known to you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God hath raised from the dead, even by him this man standeth here before you whole. This is the stone which was rejected by you the builders, which is become the head of the corner. Neither is there salvation in any other. For there is no other name under heaven given to men, whereby we must be saved.

Oh! how true is this, dear Jesus! no other Name but thine could give us salvation, and thy Name means Savior. Be thou praised for having taken such a Name! Be thou praised for having saved us! Thou art of heaven heavenly, and yet thou takest a Name on earth, and one which our mortal lips can say.

The holy Church then commences a second canticle in praise of this divine Name, which is blessed by all nations, for it is the name of him who redeemed them all.

Gradual

Salvos fac nos, Domine Deus noster; et congrega nos de nationibus: ut confiteamur Nomini sancto tuo, et gloriemur in laude tua.

Save us, O Lord, our God! and gather us from amidst the nations: that we may give thanks to thy holy Name, and may glory in thy praise.

℣. Tu, Domine, Pater noster, et Redemptor noster; a sæculo nomen tuum.

℣. Thou, Lord, art our Father and Redeemer; thy Name is from eternity.

Alleluia, alleluia.

Alleluia, alleluia.

℣. Laudem Domini loquetur os meum, et benedicat omnis caro Nomen sanctum ejus. Alleluia.

℣. My mouth shall publish the praises of the Lord, and let all flesh bless his holy Name. Alleluia.

After Septuagesima, the following Tract is sung, instead of the Alleluia.

Tract

Domine, Deus virtutum, converte nos; et ostende faciem tuam et salvi erimus: sonet vox tua in auribus meis.

Convert us to thee, O Lord God of hosts; and show thy face, and we shall be saved: let thy voice sound in my ears.

℣. Vox enim tua dulcis, et facies tua decora nimis.

℣. For sweet is thy voice, and very beautiful is thy countenance.

℣. Oleum effusum Nomen tuum, Jesu; ideo adolescentulæ dilexerunt te.

℣. Thy Name, O Jesus, is as oil poured out; therefore have virgins loved thee.

Gospel

Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Lucam.

Sequel of the holy Gospel according to St. Luke.

Cap.ii. Ch. ii.

In illo tempore: Postquam consummati sunt dies octo, ut circumcideretur puer, vocatum est nomen ejus Jesus, quod vocatum est ab angelo priusquam in utero conciperetur.

At that time: After eight days were accomplished, that the child should be circumcised, his name was called Jesus, which was called by the angel, before he was conceived in the womb.

It is during the first shedding of thy Blood, by the Circumcision, that thou didst receive this Name of Jesus, dear Lord! and it was fitting that it should be so, for this Name signifies Savior, and we could not be saved but by thy Blood. Our immortal life is to be purchased at the price of thy Death! This truth is expressed to us by thy Name, O Jesus! Savior! Thou art the Vine, and thou invitest us to drink of thy delicious Wine; but the heavenly Fruit must be first unsparingly pressed in the wine-press of thy Eternal Father’s justice; we cannot drink of its juice, until it shall have been torn from the branch and bruised for our sakes. May thy sacred Name ever remind us of this sublime Mystery, and may the remembrance keep us from sin, and make us always faithful.

During the Offertory, the holy Church resumes her chants in honor of the Holy Name; she celebrates the mercies, which are reserved for all them that call on this Name.

Offertory

Confitebor tibi, Domine Deus meus, in toto corde meo; et glorificabo Nomen tuum in æternum. Quoniam tu, Domine, suavis et mitis es, multæ misericordiæ omnibus invocantibus te. Alleluia.

I will praise thee, O Lord my God, with my whole heart, and I will glorify thy name for ever; because, O Lord, thou art good and gracious, and full of mercy towards all that call upon thee. Alleluia.

Secret

Benedictio tua, clementissime Deus, qua omnis viget creatura, sanctificet, quæsumus, hoc sacrificium nostrum, quod ad gloriam Nominis Filii tui Domini nostri Jesu Christi offerimus tibi: ut majestati tuæ placere possit ad laudem, et nobis proficere ad salutem. Per eumdem.

May thy blessing, O most merciful God, by which every creature is enlivened and subsists, sanctify this our sacrifice, which we offer thee in honor of the name of thy Son, our Lord Jesus Christ: that it may be acceptable to the praise of thy majesty, and available to our salvation. Through the same, &c.

The Faithful having received the heavenly food—the Body and Blood of their Savior, Jesus—the Church, filled with gratitude towards her Lord, invites all nations to glorify the Name of him who made and redeemed them.

The holy Church has now but one more prayer to make: it is, that the names of her children may be written, under the glorious Name of “Jesus,” in the book of eternal predestination, which is, as it were, the deed of the contract made with us by our Savior. This happiness will assuredly be ours, if we are but wise enough to profit by all that this sweet Name offers us, and to make our life conformable to the lessons it teaches us.

Communion

Omnes gentes quascumque fecisti venient, et adorabunt coram te, Domine, et glorificabunt Nomen tuum: quoniam magnus es tu, et faciens mirabilia: tu es Deus solus. Alleluia.

All the nations thou hast made shall come and adore before thee, O Lord, and they shall glorify thy name, for thou art great and dost wonderful things: thou art God alone. Alleluia.

Postcommunion

Omnipotens, æterne Deus, qui creasti et redemisti nos: respice propitius vota nostra, et sacrificium salutaris hostiæ, quod in honorem Nominis Filii tui Domini nostri Jesu Christi, majestati tuæ obtulimus, placido et benigno vultu suscipere digneris; ut gratia tua nobis infusa, sub glorioso Nomine Jesu, æternæ prædestinationis titulo, gaudeamus nomina nostra scripta esse in cœlis. Per eumdem.

O Almighty and Eternal God, who didst both create and redeem us, mercifully hear our prayers, and vouchsafe, with a pleasing and kind countenance, to receive the sacrifice of this victim of our salvation, which we have offered to thy divine Majesty, in honor of the Name of thy Son, our Lord Jesus Christ; that thy grace being poured upon us, through the glorious Name of Jesus as a pledge of our eternal predestination, we may rejoice that our names are written in heaven. Through the same, &c.

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